Tag Archive for knitting

I started to think you were just a madman with a linkspam.

I thought you guys might appreciate this GIF, and The Organization for Transformative Works‘s observation that “This is what fandom is.”

A GIF from Harry Potter. In it, Ron reads Harry's tea leaves and says, "...you're gonna suffer, but you're gonna be happy about it."

On Whatever, John Scalzi outlines an excellent metaphor for illustrating privilege without using the word:

Dudes. Imagine life here in the US — or indeed, pretty much anywhere in the Western world — is a massive role playing game, like World of Warcraft except appallingly mundane, where most quests involve the acquisition of money, cell phones and donuts, although not always at the same time. Let’s call it The Real World. You have installed The Real World on your computer and are about to start playing, but first you go to the settings tab to bind your keys, fiddle with your defaults, and choose the difficulty setting for the game. Got it?

Okay: In the role playing game known as The Real World, “Straight White Male” is the lowest difficulty setting there is.

It’s excellent. Go read the whole thing.

Via i09, a very pretty TARDIS scarf, and free instructions on knitting it.

A close-up of detail from the TARDIS scarf, in light blue.

Via Nerd Approved, a cat house shaped like a TARDIS. If you’re interested in TARDIS-inspired cat houses, you can check out another one at The Mary Sue.

A kitty sits in a TARDIS house. Alternating panels on the TARDIS are cut out, and we can see that there are carpeted shelves in those cutouts.

More seriously, this “I Had An Abortion” post at Maehem Sez, is getting a lot of attention, for good reason.

And at Think Progress, Scarlett Johansson (Black Widow in the recent Avengers movie) talks about the ridiculous, sexist portrayals of superheroines.

Feminist Whoniverse talks about Moffat’s recent Twitter reveal that River Song is bisexual, and argues that because her queerness is pretty much invisible, this does nothing for queer visibility in the show.

If you have a suggestion for our linkspam, please email it to: courtney (at) doctorher (dot) com.

I have linkspam now. Linkspam is cool.

Hoyden About Town looks at knitted sonic screwdrivers.

In Bitch Magazine, Carrie Nelson writes about the representation of bisexuality via the character of Jack Harkness in Torchwood:

Jack’s characterization is refreshing simply because his sexuality is presented so naturally. Though it’s frequently referenced, it’s never overanalyzed or challenged. It just is. This is a rarity in depictions of bisexuality in the media. So many bi-centric storylines in movies and television shows tend to focus on overwhelming problems and pressure to change one’s sexuality or pick a side. But this isn’t the case with Jack. Not only is he allowed to be who he is, he’s allowed to be happy with that identity.

In case you missed it, the BBC released the first official picture of new companion.

Maybe you heard! The movie Hunger Games was released on March 23, with great success! A few Hunger Games-related links:

Courtney Martin wrote a lovely article on fan activism at the New York Times, focusing on the Hunger is Not a Game campaign by Hunger Games fans. Shortly after the movie’s release, Lionsgate decided to be completely douchey, and try to shut down those fan advocates for diluting their IP.

There was a great piece on why you should watch/read Hunger Games at Alternet. The last paragraph, in particular, is excellent:

Perhaps its adolesent core of distrust is what makes The Hunger Games so appealing. Teens begin to notice the lie behind claims of a meritocracy, the way certain kinds of privilege are rewarded and bad authority, from a corrupt president to an arbitrary teacher, is obeyed. The Hunger Games, true to its YA nature, is propelled less by a specific agenda and more by a feeling – the feeling that the system is rigged and the adults are just sitting around doing nothing about it. Perhaps that’s why the series has legions of adult followers–it allows us to give expression to a loud, seditious frustration that our sensible society has deemed unseemly and unrealistic.

And in your daily dose of “humanity is awful,” Jezebel talks about how some Hunger Games fans are distressed that the Black character in the book, Rue, is played by a Black actress. This also inspired a rather decent article with a brief history of whitewashing, also at Jezebel.