Tag Archive for fan activism

I have linkspam now. Linkspam is cool.

Hoyden About Town looks at knitted sonic screwdrivers.

In Bitch Magazine, Carrie Nelson writes about the representation of bisexuality via the character of Jack Harkness in Torchwood:

Jack’s characterization is refreshing simply because his sexuality is presented so naturally. Though it’s frequently referenced, it’s never overanalyzed or challenged. It just is. This is a rarity in depictions of bisexuality in the media. So many bi-centric storylines in movies and television shows tend to focus on overwhelming problems and pressure to change one’s sexuality or pick a side. But this isn’t the case with Jack. Not only is he allowed to be who he is, he’s allowed to be happy with that identity.

In case you missed it, the BBC released the first official picture of new companion.

Maybe you heard! The movie Hunger Games was released on March 23, with great success! A few Hunger Games-related links:

Courtney Martin wrote a lovely article on fan activism at the New York Times, focusing on the Hunger is Not a Game campaign by Hunger Games fans. Shortly after the movie’s release, Lionsgate decided to be completely douchey, and try to shut down those fan advocates for diluting their IP.

There was a great piece on why you should watch/read Hunger Games at Alternet. The last paragraph, in particular, is excellent:

Perhaps its adolesent core of distrust is what makes The Hunger Games so appealing. Teens begin to notice the lie behind claims of a meritocracy, the way certain kinds of privilege are rewarded and bad authority, from a corrupt president to an arbitrary teacher, is obeyed. The Hunger Games, true to its YA nature, is propelled less by a specific agenda and more by a feeling — the feeling that the system is rigged and the adults are just sitting around doing nothing about it. Perhaps that’s why the series has legions of adult followers–it allows us to give expression to a loud, seditious frustration that our sensible society has deemed unseemly and unrealistic.

And in your daily dose of “humanity is awful,” Jezebel talks about how some Hunger Games fans are distressed that the Black character in the book, Rue, is played by a Black actress. This also inspired a rather decent article with a brief history of whitewashing, also at Jezebel.